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Topic Good day-Bad day. Go to previous topic Go to next topic Go to higher level

By jockdoc On 2007.11.29 07:12
Wednesday was her worst day, following a good day. Only God knows what today will present for us. She truly wants to die, and I can't blame her. Doc say this will not happen from pain. I'm not sure. Jock Doc and Barb

By kuttlewis On 2007.11.29 09:35
Jock Doc,
I believe people can die from pain. My father had kidney stones that caused a lot of pain. For some reasons, instead of dealing with the stones, the doctors started looking for cancer. They finally found it and within six months, my father died. I believe the cancer came from unrelieved pain.

I pray Barb has another good day today.

Inge

By Pearly4 On 2007.11.29 17:40
So hard for everyone - those watching as well as those in pain. If only there were another way. Sending prayers your way as well as Barb's.

By annwood On 2007.11.29 18:52
Jockdoc - I think of you and Barb several times a day. The pain is so hard to deal with and something that doesn't appear to be that common in PD, atleast at her level. Have they considered nerve blocks or epidurals? I understand how hard it is to let go. My husband is slipping fast. The Hospice nurse was here today and was startled at the decline in just a week. He has become combative and unable to speak. Cries most of the time. Like you, I am finding this final phase very difficult.

By jockdoc On 2007.11.29 23:24
Well we found why Barb was in such intense pain. When she fell breaking her shoulder she also broke her hip. When they had xrayed earlier they missed the tiny fractre, but with Rehab the ball of the joint fell loose causing the terrible pain. She got a new hip tonight. Amen Thanks for the prayers. Jock Doc and Barb

By annwood On 2007.11.29 23:57
Unbelievable! I hope things go better now for both of you.

By ckckk On 2007.12.04 21:35
I am at the point I don't know how much longer ai can take this way of living. My husband has had Parkinsons for about 5 years, fully loaded with medications of every kind. Halluncinations are always there. The NEURO had him on 75 mg seroquel nightly and now 25 mg more in a.m. We had a family mtg last week and they suggested I get in-home help so I can leave and get away/he does not want this. Also next on list would be to get him to a Sr. Behavioral Health hospital for evaluation. I am in tears because I am no help to him (he thinks I am stealing his money, going out with other men, etc.) I'm sure many of you have been through this. Any advice? KRC

By ckckk On 2007.12.04 21:40
I am at the point I don't know how much longer I can take this way of living. My husband has had Parkinsons for about 5 years, fully loaded with medications of every kind. Hallucinations are always there. The NEURO had him on 75 mg seroquel nightly and now 25 mg more in a.m. We had a family mtg last week and they suggested I get in-home help so I can leave and get away/he does not want this. Also next on list would be to get him to a Sr. Behavioral Health hospital for evaluation. I am in tears because I am no help to him (he thinks I am stealing his money, going out with other men, etc.) I'm sure many of you have been through this. Any advice? KRC

By annwood On 2007.12.04 23:02
Read my post under "one has to laugh". I am going through the same thing and have been since August. Having help, if only for a few hours, is a godsend. I find if Ionly get away to the grocery I can be around normal people and I feel recharged. I cry a great deal of the time because it seems endless. You MUST think of yourself and what this is doing to you. Remember this is not your husband making the demands but a person who has been taken over by the disease. The caregiver tells me that my husband is much like a child - after I am gone he quits whinning about it.

The very best thing that has happened for me is the involvement of Hospice. Ask the physician for a referral. They will do home care, provide all of the meds, send in aides 2 or 3 times a week to bathe him, wash his hair or just sit for a couple of hours. They have provided a hospital bed, bedside table, alarms, etc. Anything you need including a shoulder to cry on. Perhaps the biggest help is they do the communication with the physicians and they somehow get a prompt response from him.

Remember that many of us are in the same situation and we are here when you need to ventilate. There will be a time when tis is over and you will once again have a normal life.


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