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Topic Care Giving Go to previous topic Go to next topic Go to higher level

By dans316 On 2017.01.01 05:24
Thought maybe some might be interested in a caregiving article. http://khn.org/news/caring-for-a-loved-one-at-home-can-have-a-steep-learning-curve/

Maybe like Diabetes Education Programs, someday there will be a Home Caregiver Program offered for Parkinson's. Most of my limited education for caregiving was obtained from this forum and trial & error.

Me Ke Aloha,
Dan

By carman96 On 2017.01.02 17:28
Thanks Dan. Interesting article.
It would be good if we didn't have to learn caregiving by trial and error. I think one of the problems with PD is its gradual. We aren't suddenly thrust into caregiving, we just learn to deal with things as they come.

By Mary556 On 2017.01.02 22:03
Thanks for sharing the article and video, Dan. So true. Hope this family's story will bring more awareness of some important issues. The doctor who was quoted about leaving the hospital "quick and sick" got that right. Caregivers need more resources and preparation. My Dad was released from hospital needing an injection that evening at home. His wonderful discharge nurse guided me to a video that walked me through the steps, but still. Fortunate for us, a retired nurse who lives at the end of our street came over at bedtime; she hugged me and talked with me in our garage before coming upstairs to coach me as I gave my father the needle. What comfort she gave us. As difficult as some days have been, we have received many blessings as well. I wish everyone could have a kind helper appear out of nowhere, whenever we need one. It is not a good feeling to fly solo when you do not know what you are doing.

Similar to Angela in the story, we were in a quandary when my mother's bedsore advanced to an open wound (unstageable) because I did not know what it was. Later when my father had skin irritation, I did not recognize it as beginning pressure sore, but his doctor soon did. The visiting nurses were very helpful for us as well.

Dan, on a personal note, I want to thank you for telling us (many months ago) about alternating pressure mattress to prevent bed sores. We did get a twin-size pad version to fit Mom's hospital bed and there was definite benefit for both of my parents. My father was in and out of hospital three times within a year and his pressure sore started to come back. Dad could not wait to get home to "his bubbles". It also relieves pain in his back and he sleeps well. This has been a great comfort for him. (He has too few comforts these days.) I've been wanting to let you know we are very grateful for that advice.

Sorry this is so long.
God bless all patients and their caregivers.


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