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Topic Low protein snacks Go to previous topic Go to next topic Go to higher level

By mylove On 2017.07.16 10:23
Hi folks! We have unwillingly joined the ranks of those who can't mix Sinemet and protein after 19 "honeymoon" years where we were getting away with it. The good news is that the Sinemet hasn't quit working, like we feared, so we don't have to drastically up doses - we just need to adjust meals. A MUCH preferable problem!

I have the three meals figured out. Those were easy. But we are having a lot of challenges co,ing up with low or no protein SNACKS. Think: things that can be grab and go - no cooking or prep, etc. I work during the day and if he has to fix something, he just won't eat. Also not an optimal solution because he's lost a lot of weight over the past few years and needs to keep it on.

In googling, I find tons of RECIPES, but outside of fruits and veggies (which frankly, he isn't going to eat), I'm not finding many snack ideas that are easy to grab and won't interact with his Sinemet. What do you guys do when you're short on time but still need to provide some between meal snacks?

By VioletV On 2017.07.16 15:51
Low protein snacks: chips and salsa, cookies, little cakes, small ziploc bags of popcorn with truffle zest (delicious!!), avocado slices and tomato slices, bacon rinds, rice cakes, bread and butter with lots of jam. Soup, pasta and sauce that can be microwaved.

Is this the kind of thing you have in mind? Or do you mean small meals.

My pwp's weight stays under 120, so I am always trying to push carbs. He doesn't have problems with blood pressure or cholesterol, so that makes it easy.

By sharron On 2017.07.18 00:47
If weight is not an issue, think about his favorite foods that are not protein oriented. Apple pie has no protein, only fruit, flower and fat. French bread with olive oil dip. You can put balsamic vinegar or minced garlic in the olive oil. It can stay in the refrig for up to 2 weeks. He can just warm the olive oil up in the microwave for about 3 seconds. Pasta with meatless spaghetti sauce, coleslaw, potato salad. Maybe this can help a little. Many cookies have very little protein. Cinnamon toast?
The protein in bread is so small it is worth a try to see if they will not interfere with his meds. Most breads are made with no eggs, check the ingredients.

By mylove On 2017.07.18 08:35
The sweets suggestions, cinnamon toast, and popcorn might be just the ticket. I'll run with those - thanks so much!

Violet - he's lost about 30 pounds in the past 3-4 years, so I'm not worried about carbs or fat either. Luckily he's healthy other than the PD, so nothing is off the table foodwise.

The only challenge is finding something that he WILL eat. He is willing to make himself meals (pb&j, grilled tuna Sammies, egg sandwiches, etc...all of which now pose problems but at least are on alternate times than his pill times), but is not going to put forth that kind of effort on behalf of a snack. That's why the trail mixes and mixed nuts were our answer. Salty, tasty, and immediate access. Unfortunately it may be that there is no perfect replacement that he will still seek out on his own.

I did find one solution: Drumstick ice cream pops. :). Wish I had problems putting weight ON!

By jcoff012 On 2017.07.18 21:50
Found this today...

https://www.dietaryfiberfood.com/protein/protein-low.php

Weight Watchers wasn't much help...in fact, they WANT members to up their protein!

By Lynnie2 On 2017.07.19 10:39
Personally I don't worry about the protein in snacks as I have enough to do just getting the pills into him.
I don't know how much they would interfere anyway as you aren't eating meats are you?

By mylove On 2017.07.19 22:00
Umm...YES. Lol. Tons of it. He's very much red-blooded, red meat eating male. :)

I'm thinking the neuro might be onto something. His typical breakfast is egg sandwiches. Lunch is probably PB&J. Dinner has meat/veg/starch, but our meat servings are pretty large. And all day long he was snacking on handfuls of peanuts and mixed nuts to be able to wait for me to get home to make dinner. He eats a LOT of protein. So far we can fix the lunch and breakfast, and we are trying to time out the dinner between pills, but it's those darn snacks I can't crack.

A smart person on my Facebook today suggested taking the Atkins diet list and reversing it - choosing from all the things they say NOT to eat! Genius!

By mylove On 2017.07.19 22:02
Thanks for the link, Jane. Hmm...chips, popcorn, and sweets. That might work.

By Mary556 On 2017.07.20 11:47
my Dad's standby snack is graham crackers, sometimes with a 1/2-cup individual serving of org apple sauce. He likes the Dole individual servings of peaches. maybe V-8 juice would be good? sometimes for a light meal my father eats a bowl of macaroni with canned tomatoes, no meat.
drumstick ice cream cones - Yum. I never understood if any amount of protein will interfere with C/L-dopa? quick search: a serving of ice cream may have 3-4 grams of protein, a typical hamburger has 20.

By LOHENGR1N On 2017.07.21 00:34
Mary, without getting scientific or too technical with the workings of protein, protein will interfere with our C/L-Dopa absorption. It is not a case of just for the heck of it the protein starts doing this, it does it all the time but with the progression of the disease we have less and less dopamine being made in our brain so we need more of the medicine to reach our brain. It is absorbed into the blood stream and carried to the brain. An easy explanation I think is remember the fisher price trains for the kids or grandchildren? They have a few cars and you put animals or people in/on them? you know the figures have circles or squares, triangles different shapes on the bottom that fit in the same shape holes on the train cars? Well the blood stream (our fisher price train is kind of the same) different molecules can attach to carriers, each has their own shape to do this and it turns out that protein and the C/L-dopa fit onto the same carriers in our blood stream and we have in time a problem because the protein hops on, then the C/L-Dopa can't, so We do not get as much to the blood brain barrier and into our brain so We have to try to eat protein when we are not taking the medicine giving the little train cars a chance to empty out. Then when we take our medicine it doesn't have to compete with anything to get a spot on the train (blood stream). Low protein snacks or lunches spaced between doses of our medication give our medicine the best chance to get to our brain and do it's job.

I hope this helps to explain the C/L-Dopa and protein mystery or problem many have.

By mylove On 2017.07.21 09:25
That's the PERFECT explanation of the mechanism, as well as why you can "honeymoon" for a long time and get away with things but then suddenly have a change in whether you can do something or not. Thanks!

By flowers12 On 2017.07.21 10:00
LOHENGR1N thanks for the easy to understand explanation. I have always tried to follow the timing of protein to pills but my hubby gets up and then eats breakfast at different times which makes it difficult. His preference for breakfast is usually hash and eggs. I've had to really time his pills more than ever because after 3 hours I notice his hand beginning to shake and at 4 hours both hands are shaking. Eating and pill time is a challenge.

By Mary556 On 2017.07.21 12:50
Al, thank you for explaining that so well. Your analogies are the best, very well thought-out and easy to follow. Thank you for your kindness & for all you do to help us understand.

By LOHENGR1N On 2017.07.21 16:05
Thanks "guys" I'm glad I was able to help.

By makrivah On 2017.07.21 20:56
Al, WELL DONE!
I'll try your metaphor with my husband. Maybe that will help him understand why we eat or don't eat certain foods AND that when he does eat protein why I am mindful of timing with pills.

Thank you again, Al.

By jcoff012 On 2017.07.25 14:18
Michelle, just checked the Parkinson's Foundation for nutrition information and they suggest graham crackers! Taken with Sinemet, supposedly one of the best things you can take! Interesting!


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